Chernóbil, 27 años después

Un guardia en un puesto de mando que marca el punto de los 30 kilómetros alrededor de la planta nuclear de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

Un guardia en un puesto de mando que marca el punto de los 30 kilómetros alrededor de la planta nuclear de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

Vista de la estructura New Safe Confinement (NSC) en la planta nuclear de Chernóbil. The NSC será colocado encima del sarcófago existente tendrá un alcance de 247 metros (270 yardas) y un peso de 29.000 toneladas, cuando se ensamble. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

Vista de la estructura New Safe Confinement (NSC) en la planta nuclear de Chernóbil. The NSC será colocado encima del sarcófago existente tendrá un alcance de 247 metros (270 yardas) y un peso de 29.000 toneladas, cuando se ensamble. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

Un crucifijo en el área desierta del poblado ucraniano Pripyat. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

Un crucifijo en el área desierta del poblado ucraniano Pripyat. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

Una vista de la ciudad abandonada Pripyat cerca de la planta nuclear de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

Una vista de la ciudad abandonada Pripyat cerca de la planta nuclear de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

 

La ciudad desierta cerca de la planta de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

La ciudad desierta cerca de la planta de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

El escudo de armas de la antigua Unión Soviética se ve en techo de una casa en la la ciudad abandonada de Pripyat cerca de la planta de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

El escudo de armas de la antigua Unión Soviética se ve en techo de una casa en la la ciudad abandonada de Pripyat cerca de la planta de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

 

A view of the abandoned city of Pripyat is seen near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ANNIVERSARY)

A view of the abandoned city of Pripyat is seen near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world’s worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE – Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ANNIVERSARY)

 

A containment shelter for the damaged fourth reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is seen from Ukraine's abandoned town of Pripyat April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ANNIVERSARY)

A containment shelter for the damaged fourth reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is seen from Ukraine’s abandoned town of Pripyat April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world’s worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE – Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ANNIVERSARY)

A containment shelter for the damaged fourth reactor (L) and the New Safe Confinement (NSC) structure (R) at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant are seen from Ukraine's abandoned town of Pripyat April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. The NSC, to be placed over the existing sarcophagus, will have a span of 247 meters (270 yards) and weigh 29,000 tonnes when fully assembled, according to the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

A containment shelter for the damaged fourth reactor (L) and the New Safe Confinement (NSC) structure (R) at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant are seen from Ukraine’s abandoned town of Pripyat April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world’s worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. The NSC, to be placed over the existing sarcophagus, will have a span of 247 meters (270 yards) and weigh 29,000 tonnes when fully assembled, according to the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

A containment shelter for the damaged fourth reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is seen from Ukraine's abandoned town of Pripyat April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ANNIVERSARY)

A containment shelter for the damaged fourth reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is seen from Ukraine’s abandoned town of Pripyat April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world’s worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE – Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ANNIVERSARY)

 

A Ferris wheel at a playground in the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

A Ferris wheel at a playground in the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

A view of an underpass in the deserted town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

A view of an underpass in the deserted town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

 

Wild plants grow through widows of an abandoned house in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Wild plants grow through widows of an abandoned house in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

 

An abandoned middle school, part of the contaminated area surrounding the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, in Pripyat, Ukraine. The ghost town which once had a population of about 50,000 people, was given a few hours to evacuate in April 1986 as radiation streamed into populated areas after an explosion at the reactor. (Joseph Sywenkyj/The New York Times)

An abandoned middle school, part of the contaminated area surrounding the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, in Pripyat, Ukraine. The ghost town which once had a population of about 50,000 people, was given a few hours to evacuate in April 1986 as radiation streamed into populated areas after an explosion at the reactor. (Joseph Sywenkyj/The New York Times)

An interior view of a building in the abandoned city of Prypiat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

An interior view of a building in the abandoned city of Prypiat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

Dilapidated shelves in a dressing room of a kindergarten at the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

Dilapidated shelves in a dressing room of a kindergarten at the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

Portraits of ancient physicists and mathematicians hang on a wall in a school in the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

Portraits of ancient physicists and mathematicians hang on a wall in a school in the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

A doll with a gas mask lies on the frame of a bed in the sleeping room of a kindergarten in the deserted town of in Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

A doll with a gas mask lies on the frame of a bed in the sleeping room of a kindergarten in the deserted town of in Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

A tern dips into the water as it feeds just off the banks of the Pripyat River, near the town of Turov, some 270 km (167 miles) south of Minsk, Friday, May 6, 2011.

A tern dips into the water as it feeds just off the banks of the Pripyat River, near the town of Turov, some 270 km (167 miles) south of Minsk, Friday, May 6, 2011.

A view of empty houses in the town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

A view of empty houses in the town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

A view of empty houses in the deserted town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

A view of empty houses in the deserted town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

     Un guardia en un puesto de mando que marca el punto de los 30 kilómetros alrededor de la planta nuclear de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich     Vista de la estructura New Safe Confinement (NSC) en la planta nuclear de Chernóbil. The NSC será colocado encima del sarcófago existente tendrá un alcance de 247 metros (270 yardas) y un peso de 29.000 toneladas, cuando se ensamble. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich     Un crucifijo en el área desierta del poblado ucraniano Pripyat. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich     Una vista de la ciudad abandonada Pripyat cerca de la planta nuclear de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich     La ciudad desierta cerca de la planta de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich     El escudo de armas de la antigua Unión Soviética se ve en techo de una casa en la la ciudad abandonada de Pripyat cerca de la planta de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich     A view of the abandoned city of Pripyat is seen near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ANNIVERSARY)     A containment shelter for the damaged fourth reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is seen from Ukraine's abandoned town of Pripyat April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ANNIVERSARY)     A containment shelter for the damaged fourth reactor (L) and the New Safe Confinement (NSC) structure (R) at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant are seen from Ukraine's abandoned town of Pripyat April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. The NSC, to be placed over the existing sarcophagus, will have a span of 247 meters (270 yards) and weigh 29,000 tonnes when fully assembled, according to the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich menos      A containment shelter for the damaged fourth reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is seen from Ukraine's abandoned town of Pripyat April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ANNIVERSARY)     A Ferris wheel at a playground in the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)     A view of an underpass in the deserted town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)     Wild plants grow through widows of an abandoned house in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj     An abandoned middle school, part of the contaminated area surrounding the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, in Pripyat, Ukraine. The ghost town which once had a population of about 50,000 people, was given a few hours to evacuate in April 1986 as radiation streamed into populated areas after an explosion at the reactor. (Joseph Sywenkyj/The New York Times)     An interior view of a building in the abandoned city of Prypiat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich     Dilapidated shelves in a dressing room of a kindergarten at the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)     Portraits of ancient physicists and mathematicians hang on a wall in a school in the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) menos      A doll with a gas mask lies on the frame of a bed in the sleeping room of a kindergarten in the deserted town of in Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) menos      A tern dips into the water as it feeds just off the banks of the Pripyat River, near the town of Turov, some 270 km (167 miles) south of Minsk, Friday, May 6, 2011.     A view of empty houses in the town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)     A view of empty houses in the deserted town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)     A dog walks in the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

A dog walks in the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

     Un guardia en un puesto de mando que marca el punto de los 30 kilómetros alrededor de la planta nuclear de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich     Vista de la estructura New Safe Confinement (NSC) en la planta nuclear de Chernóbil. The NSC será colocado encima del sarcófago existente tendrá un alcance de 247 metros (270 yardas) y un peso de 29.000 toneladas, cuando se ensamble. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich     Un crucifijo en el área desierta del poblado ucraniano Pripyat. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich     Una vista de la ciudad abandonada Pripyat cerca de la planta nuclear de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich     La ciudad desierta cerca de la planta de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich     El escudo de armas de la antigua Unión Soviética se ve en techo de una casa en la la ciudad abandonada de Pripyat cerca de la planta de Chernóbil. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich     A view of the abandoned city of Pripyat is seen near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ANNIVERSARY)     A containment shelter for the damaged fourth reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is seen from Ukraine's abandoned town of Pripyat April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ANNIVERSARY)     A containment shelter for the damaged fourth reactor (L) and the New Safe Confinement (NSC) structure (R) at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant are seen from Ukraine's abandoned town of Pripyat April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. The NSC, to be placed over the existing sarcophagus, will have a span of 247 meters (270 yards) and weigh 29,000 tonnes when fully assembled, according to the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich menos      A containment shelter for the damaged fourth reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is seen from Ukraine's abandoned town of Pripyat April 23, 2013. Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ANNIVERSARY)     A Ferris wheel at a playground in the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)     A view of an underpass in the deserted town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)     Wild plants grow through widows of an abandoned house in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj     An abandoned middle school, part of the contaminated area surrounding the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, in Pripyat, Ukraine. The ghost town which once had a population of about 50,000 people, was given a few hours to evacuate in April 1986 as radiation streamed into populated areas after an explosion at the reactor. (Joseph Sywenkyj/The New York Times)     An interior view of a building in the abandoned city of Prypiat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich     Dilapidated shelves in a dressing room of a kindergarten at the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)     Portraits of ancient physicists and mathematicians hang on a wall in a school in the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) menos      A doll with a gas mask lies on the frame of a bed in the sleeping room of a kindergarten in the deserted town of in Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) menos      A tern dips into the water as it feeds just off the banks of the Pripyat River, near the town of Turov, some 270 km (167 miles) south of Minsk, Friday, May 6, 2011.     A view of empty houses in the town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)     A view of empty houses in the deserted town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)     A dog walks in the deserted town of Pripyat, Ukraine, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Chernobyl and Fukushima are some 5,000 miles apart but have much in common. The towns nearest to each of these stricken nuclear power stations, in Ukraine and Japan, whose disasters struck 25 years apart, already reveal eerie similarities. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)     In this photo taken April 2, 2006, an obstetric chair is seen in front of a hospital in the deserted town of Pripyat, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant.

In this photo taken April 2, 2006, an obstetric chair is seen in front of a hospital in the deserted town of Pripyat, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear plant.

In this photo taken April 2, 2006, book shelves are seen in the deserted town of Pripyat, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant.

In this photo taken April 2, 2006, book shelves are seen in the deserted town of Pripyat, some 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant.

The remnants of beds are seen in an abandoned in a pre school in the deserted town of Pripyat on January 25, 2006 in Chernobyl, Ukraine. Prypyat and the surrounding area will not be safe for human habitation for several centuries. Scientists estimate that the most dangerous radioactive elements will take up to 900 years to decay sufficiently to render the area safe. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

The remnants of beds are seen in an abandoned in a pre school in the deserted town of Pripyat on January 25, 2006 in Chernobyl, Ukraine. Prypyat and the surrounding area will not be safe for human habitation for several centuries. Scientists estimate that the most dangerous radioactive elements will take up to 900 years to decay sufficiently to render the area safe. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recibe Cuba sexto buque para transportación de carga a granel

BEIJING. — El sexto buque granelero de una serie de 10 construidos en los astilleros de Shanghai para Cuba como parte de un proyecto conjunto entre ese país y China fue entregado hoy durante una ceremonia en el puerto de esa ciudad.

barco-chinaMa Shixiong, presidente de los Astilleros de Shanghai, dijo que este proyecto sino-cubano constituye un modelo de cooperación y un puente de amistad entre dos países socialistas y en vías de desarrollo.

El funcionario aseguró que esa entidad continuará fortaleciendo los vínculos con ese país caribeño y recordó los más de 50 años de relaciones diplomáticas entre ambos Estados.

El embajador de Cuba en China, Alberto Blanco, destacó por su parte la importancia estratégica para las relaciones económicas- comerciales y de cooperación entre Cuba y China que representa la construcción de estas embarcaciones para carga a granel.

Esta cooperación, agregó, se proyecta a mediano plazo con todas sus potencialidades y tiene lugar en el contexto de la actualización del modelo social y económico en Cuba.

Al respecto, el embajador se refirió a las directivas aprobadas en el VI Congreso del Partido Comunista el pasado año en su país, en las que se aboga por desarrollar de forma integral la flota mercante nacional.

Explicó que el buque Lidia lleva el nombre de una heroína de la lucha por la liberación en Cuba y valerosa mensajera del Ejército Rebelde (Lidia Doce), de quien dijo que fue ejemplo de lealtad a sus compañeros de lucha y a su patria.

En la ceremonia en el puerto de esta ciudad cosmopolita de la costa oriental asistieron representantes de las empresas chinas ejecutoras del proyecto.

Por la parte cubana, además del embajador y representantes del consulado cubano en Shanghai estuvieron directivos de empresas marítimas, el grupo de ingenieros y técnicos que supervisa el proceso de construcción de los buques y parte de la tripulación del Lidia. (PL)

 

La tasa de desempleo en España ha alcanzado su cifra record

desempleo_7espaa

La tasa de desempleo en España ha alcanzado su cifra record de más 6 millones de personas sin trabajo, un 27 por ciento, según datos divulgados por el Instituto Nacional de Estadística (INE) de España.

La Encuesta de la Población Activa indicó que la tasa de desempleo entre los meses de enero y marzo superó los pronósticos y escaló hasta el 27,16 por ciento desde el 26,02 por ciento del trimestre anterior.

La cantidad aumentó en el primer trimestre en 237 mil 400 personas para alcanzar los 6 millones 202 mil 700 desempleados.

Según el Banco de España, la economía del país encadenó en el primer trimestre del año la séptima contracción consecutiva al caer un 0.5 por ciento intertrimestral y un 2.0 por ciento interanual.

El INE anunciará oficialmente el dato del producto interior bruto del país el próximo 30 de abril en su versión preliminar. La institución encargada de la estadística indica que este nuevo aumento de desempleo afecta prácticamente a todos los grupos de edad, especialmente al de 25 a 29 años que pierde 69 mil 900 ocupados y prácticamente a todas las comunidades autónomas, con Andalucía (sur) a la cabeza con 36,87 por ciento de desempleo.

Muestra significativa de la “fractura social” que alertan todas las organizaciones humanitarias es el número de familias con todos sus miembros en paro, que ya son 1 millón 906 mil 100 sobre un total de 17 millones en una población de 47 millones de habitantes.

A esta tasa de desempleo se le suma el retroceso del Producto Interior Bruto que en el primer trimestre, según la primera estimación del Banco de España, se contrajo un 0,5 por ciento después que la economía cayera un 1,37 por ciento en 2012.

Marzo se cerró con un total de 16 millones 634 mil 700 ocupados, nivel que no se alcanzaba desde el segundo trimestre de 2002, cuando la ocupación no llegaba a los 16,6 millones de personas.

http://www.aporrea.org/

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